Gardening

Learn About Growing Aloha Lily Plants

While adding flower bulbs to the garden may require some initial investment, they reward gardeners with years of beauty. Aloha lily bulbs, for example, bloom on short compact plants. As their name would imply, these flowers are able to add an elegant touch of tropical flare to any yard space.

What are Aloha Lily Plants?

Aloha lily Eucomis refers to a specific series of dwarf pineapple lily cultivars – Also known as Eucomis ‘Aloha Lily Leia.’ During the summer, Aloha pineapple lilies produce large flower spikes that usually range in color from white to pink purple. Aloha lily plants are also prized for their glossy green foliage which grows in low mounds.

Though Aloha lily plants thrive in hot weather, the bulbs are only cold hardy to USDA zones 7-10. Those living outside of these regions are still able to grow Aloha lily bulbs; however, they will need to lift the bulbs and store them indoors during the winter.

Dwarf Pineapple Lily Care

Learning how to grow Aloha pineapple lilies is relatively simple. Like all flowering bulbs, each bulb is sold by size. Choosing larger bulbs will yield better first year results in terms of plant and flower size.

To plant pineapple lilies, choose a well-draining location that receives full sun to partial shade. Part shade during the hottest hours of the day may be beneficial for those growing in excessively hot regions. Make certain to wait until all chance of frost has passed in your garden. Due to their small size, Aloha lily plants are ideal for planting in containers.

Aloha lily plants will remain in bloom for several weeks. Their flower longevity makes them an instant favorite in the flower bed. After the bloom has faded, the flower spike can then be removed. In some climates, the plant may rebloom towards the end of the growing season.

As the weather becomes cooler, allow the plant foliage to die back naturally. This will ensure that the bulb has the best chance of overwintering and returning the next growing season.

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